A clearer explanation of the shift function

The shift function is a power tool to compare two marginal distributions. It’s covered in detail in this previous post. Below is a new illustration which might help better understand the graphical representation of the shift function. The R code to generate the figure is available in the README of the rogme package.

Panel A illustrates two distributions, both n = 1000, that differ in spread. The observations in the scatterplots were jittered based on their local density, as implemented in ggforce::geom_sina.

Panel B illustrates the same data from panel A. The dark vertical lines mark the deciles of the distributions. The thicker vertical line in each distribution is the median. Between distributions, the matching deciles are joined by coloured lined. If the decile difference between group 1 and group 2 is positive, the line is orange; if it is negative, the line is purple. The values of the differences for deciles 1 and 9 are indicated in the superimposed labels.

Panel C focuses on the portion of the x-axis marked by the grey shaded area at the bottom of panel B. It shows the deciles of group 1 on the x-axis – the same values that are shown for group 1 in panel B. The y-axis shows the differences between deciles: the difference is large and positive for decile 1; it then progressively decreases to reach almost zero for decile 5 (the median); it becomes progressively more negative for higher deciles. Thus, for each decile the shift function illustrates by how much one distribution needs to be shifted to match another one. In our example, we illustrate by how much we need to shift deciles from group 2 to match deciles from group 1.

More generally, a shift function shows quantile differences as a function of quantiles in one group. It estimates how and by how much two distributions differ. It is thus a powerful alternative to the traditional t-test on means, which focuses on only one, non-robust, quantity. Quantiles are robust, intuitive and informative.

figure2

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